Tag Archives: no place

NewWorkPlaces

ABC Resolution: New•Work•Places

NewWorkPlaces

July 2 – July 15

What if work had no place?

A coffee shop, cafe, train, plane, automobile, library, park, park bench, under a shade tree, in a hotel, motel, business office, home office, company office, at a distance, in the cloud, connected, distributed, flexible, mobile, local, global, in a satellite space, virtual space or outer space — any place you do work is your workplace. NewWorkPlaces are a state of mind.

NewWorkPlaces are more than a site, more than the physical walls that house furniture, equipment and people, more than a collective legal entity or set of company policies and procedures. They are the places where you think, communicate, engage, interact and produce. NewWorkPlaces exist wherever and whenever work is accomplished.

To create NewWorkPlaces, first look around you. Find and tear down the walls of your personal and organizational silos. Unbox yourself and your work, and innovate processes to create new business-as-usual models. Create new programs and skills to support this new way of working. Develop the business infrastructures and support systems, whether physical, mental or virtual, needed to support, advance and enhance the work of today and tomorrow, not yesterday. Work in new ways. Work in new places. Make this ability a business asset and a personal attribute. Work is different, so do work differently.

resolve to: work anyplace

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This NewWorkPlaces picture is of the Tully Community Branch Library in San Jose, CA. Many people’s first reaction to this association as a NewWorkPlace is a library is not a workplace. I beg to differ. Your librarians are people who work and this is the place in which they do their work. Other people go there to also do work such as homework, home office work, regular office work, mobile office work and on the road work, et al.

This library is a new library. Like new work places, it provides access to information through the traditional world of the printed book. In addition, it opens up, more than can be contained by its four walls,  the larger world of knowledge through technology. Many libraries have now broadened their access in this manner. What this library goes beyond is embracing a new version of how people interact, not only with the physical entities of books, place and technology, but additionally, and more importantly, with the people inside. Continue reading